Iwc: Engineer

The models of the IWC watch for technicians at a glance

The engineer of IWC is sought after by the technology enthusiast Uhrenfans. If you are planning to buy an engineer, then you should know the current models and the history of the watch. But as the clock looks today, it has only been available since 1975. However, her birth was already 20 years earlier: The engineer already belonged to the model range at IWC at the end of 1954. The only exciting thing about the clock at that time, however, was concealed in its interior: the clinker lift developed by Albert Pellaton. In addition, it distinguished itself by its high demands on waterproofing, magnetic field protection and gait precision. In the mid-1970s, Gérald Genta handed in and missed the engineer’s iconic housing.

IWC Watch for Technicians

The history of the IWC engineer begins in the 1950s

1954/55, the engineer comes to the market in two variants. The reference 666 A shows hour, minute and central second, the 666 ad adds a date window to it. The automatic caliber 852 of the 666 A and the sister caliber 8521 of the 666 ad are works of a certain Albert Pellaton, of the technical director who has been working at the IWC since 1944. Equipped with the Pellaton lift, a patented lift system developed by Pellaton, the caliber of the first engineering watches are put under a soft iron coat to serve the Magnetfelabschirmung. Thus a magnetic field protection up to 80,000 ampere per metre (A/m) of magnetic field strength is achieved. As a result, the engineer achieved more than 16 times the resistance demanded by the Swiss standard for antimagnetic clocks. In addition, the engineer was waterproof up to ten bar and thanks to luminous mass on hour markers and pointers to read night–Among the clocks of the 1950s a rarity.

You get the engineer not only in stainless steel with steel strip, but also in gold with leather strap. Prices: 1957 cost a steel engineer as automatic with date 520 Deutsche Mark, a massive gold (18 carats) 1,330 deutsche mark. The watches with cases of 14-carat gold and stainless steel flooring are considered rarity–they cost 770 Deutsche Mark, a reasonable surcharge for pure steel. Today the models are traded between 4,000 and up to 8,000 euros depending on the state and housing material.

Gérald Genta develops the IWC engineer “Jumbo”

In the mid-1970s, the engineer began a new life: Gérald Genta, the beginning of the decade creator of Audemars Piguet Royal Oak, translates the clock into the form that remains the most obvious to the engineer. Its multi-part housing takes on a Tonneau shape and still remains round. The bezel with the characteristic five recesses for the opening tool encloses a dial, which henceforth carries the so-called millimeter paper structure. Typical of the design of Gérald Genta, it also had an integrated tape that adds to an optical unit with the housing. With its size of just under 40 millimeters, the IWC engineer was very large for that time–until today the first model in the new design language is thus named “Jumbo”. The energy supplied the caliber 8541B in the automatic version, but the new engineer, for example, is also to have quartz as reference 3003.

The movement was still surrounded by a cage of soft iron, which kept magnetism up to 80,000 A/m from the caliber 8541ES. But in the midst of the quartz crisis of the watchmaking industry, sales were bad – only just under 1,000 pieces of IWC produced by the first engineer in the Genta design. Today, depending on the state, the watch reaches prices of up to 10,000 euros–and also counts for the rarest models of watch history thanks to its small edition. The entry prices at that time were significantly below: for 2,800 Deutsche Mark, the engineer in stainless steel changed the owner, in the bicolor version of 14-carat gold and stainless steel for 5,360 mark. The series added a gold-yellow version in 18 carats–but with its price of 18,300 mark it also struck a larger hole in the savings.

1983: IWC Engineer SL “Skinny”

1983, the engineer SL was flatter and smaller, significantly less than 40 millimeters in diameter now spoke to the watch carrier. The new version, because of its slender dimensions also called “skinny”, broke with a tradition: the Manufactory caliber. For the first time, IWC set an ETA base caliber in this series. The automatic plant ETA 2892 was refined in Schaffhausen and then ran under the caliber designation “375”. In the meantime, no unknown act in the House of IWC–many of the housings from the 1980s developed Lothar Schmidt, now the owner of special watches in Frankfurt.

1989: IWC engineer 500,000 A/m

1989 blew up the engineer’s boundaries. Based on a cooperation with the military, one developed materials that make a series movement extremely magnetic field resistant. The ETA 2892 is extensively rebuilt in many details. With the engineer 500,000 A/m, IWC now offered a watch with enormous protection against magnetic fields–and that without having to use a soft-iron housing.

Not only the inhibition, but also the spiral and the balance were built from alternative materials such as niobium-zircon 25, an iron and nickel-free alloy – with immense effort. What was very exciting about the technology, however, could not be implemented in practice: The cost of this development was extremely high, but the material of the balance spiral after the assembly and a test run proved to be stable only at a fraction of the produced pieces. At the beginning of the 1990s, the production of the IWC engineer 500,000 A/m already came to an end, after just 3,000 built specimens. Today, this IWC engineer is one of the rare models that its lovers are gradually taking for themselves.

Early 1990s: IWC engineer with quartz and mechanical Chronographenaufbau

With the Mecaquarz works, the IWC engineer appeared in the early 1990s. With the caliber 633, manufactured by Richemont-group sister Jaeger-LeCoultre, she now combined two stepper switching motors with a mechanically functioning Chronographenaufbau–and with an alarm clock. Even the mechanical clocks were now driven by Jaeger-LeCoultre works, where the caliber 889/2 was used under the name “887”. The models from the time are now available with some luck for amounts of 2,000 euros. A Chronometerzeugnis impressively proves its precision.

To this day, the IWC engineer has undergone little change in the classical design–but at the same size. In the course of time, the once large-scale “jumbo” became a small model, materials such as titanium (for example, the IWC engineer double-chronograph titanium) or ceramics (IWC engineer automatic AMG Black series ceramic) have been holding the watch for the last ten years for Engineers. 2005 appeared an engineer automatic, which was clearly reminiscent of Gérald Gentas SL and was equipped with the in-house caliber 80110. 2008 then remembered a vintage collection to the roots of the model, it quoted the style of the IWC watch before Gérald Gentas “Jumbo”.

2013, the designers at IWC were inspired by the carbon chassis of a Formula 1 racing car for their technician model: The Engineer Automatic carbon performance consists of both the 46 mm-large housing and the carbon-fibre dial. This makes the watch extremely light; However, the material is not as scratch-resistant as steel.

Here you can see the official video from IWC to the engineer:

2016: IWC engineer three times New with new manufactory caliber 69370

At the 74. Goodwood members ‘ meeting, IWC presents three new engineering models, which appear in limited edition and work with the new automatic manufactory caliber 69370. The Engineer Chronograph Edition “74th members ‘ meeting at Goodwood” in 42 millimeters large pink gold enclosure there is exactly 74 times, it costs 20,500 euro.

The engineer Chronograph Edition “Rudolf Caracciola” in the 42-millimeter steel case appears in the edition of 750 copies of 7,850 euro each.

and the Engineer Chronograph Edition “W 125” in 42 millimeters, titanium and also 750 copies is for 7,950 euro to have.

The IWC engineer today

Whether due to the zeitgeist or the aesthetics: the glass bottom of some current engineering models as well as that of the Goodwood Edition allows the magnetic field protection to enter the background. However, the technology goes back to the roots of the 1950s: with Pellaton lift, for example, the caliber 80110 shows a tradition-conscious technical aesthetic, complementing the mechanism only with an optimized shock absorber system. Whatever peculiarities the IWC engineer will have–she is a classic and has her safe place in the ancestral gallery of watches.

by Thomas Gronenthal

Continuously updated article, originally posted online in December 2014.

Tags: automatic clocks, chronograph, chronometer, date display, stainless steel watches, IWC, IWC engineer, ceramic watches, manufactory caliber, quartz, Swiss watches, Titan Watch, clock with magnetic field protection, clocks up to 10,000 euro, clocks up to 30,000 euro

The models of the IWC watch for technicians at a glance

The engineer of IWC is sought after by the technology enthusiast Uhrenfans. If you are planning to buy an engineer, then you should know the current models and the history of the watch. But as the clock looks today, it has only been available since 1975. However, her birth was already 20 years earlier: The engineer already belonged to the model range at IWC at the end of 1954. The only exciting thing about the clock at that time, however, was concealed in its interior: the clinker lift developed by Albert Pellaton. In addition, it distinguished itself by its high demands on waterproofing, magnetic field protection and gait precision. In the mid-1970s, Gérald Genta handed in and missed the engineer’s iconic housing.

The history of the IWC engineer begins in the 1950s

1954/55, the engineer comes to the market in two variants. The reference 666 A shows hour, minute and central second, the 666 ad adds a date window to it. The automatic caliber 852 of the 666 A and the sister caliber 8521 of the 666 ad are works of a certain Albert Pellaton, of the technical director who has been working at the IWC since 1944. Equipped with the Pellaton lift, a patented lift system developed by Pellaton, the caliber of the first engineering watches are put under a soft iron coat to serve the Magnetfelabschirmung. Thus a magnetic field protection up to 80,000 ampere per metre (A/m) of magnetic field strength is achieved. As a result, the engineer achieved more than 16 times the resistance demanded by the Swiss standard for antimagnetic clocks. In addition, the engineer was waterproof up to ten bar and thanks to luminous mass on hour markers and pointers to read night–Among the clocks of the 1950s a rarity.

You get the engineer not only in stainless steel with steel strip, but also in gold with leather strap. Prices: 1957 cost a steel engineer as automatic with date 520 Deutsche Mark, a massive gold (18 carats) 1,330 deutsche mark. The watches with cases of 14-carat gold and stainless steel flooring are considered rarity–they cost 770 Deutsche Mark, a reasonable surcharge for pure steel. Today the models are traded between 4,000 and up to 8,000 euros depending on the state and housing material.

Gérald Genta develops the IWC engineer “Jumbo”

In the mid-1970s, the engineer began a new life: Gérald Genta, the beginning of the decade creator of Audemars Piguet Royal Oak, translates the clock into the form that remains the most obvious to the engineer. Its multi-part housing takes on a Tonneau shape and still remains round. The bezel with the characteristic five recesses for the opening tool encloses a dial, which henceforth carries the so-called millimeter paper structure. Typical of the design of Gérald Genta, it also had an integrated tape that adds to an optical unit with the housing. With its size of just under 40 millimeters, the IWC engineer was very large for that time–until today the first model in the new design language is thus named “Jumbo”. The energy supplied the caliber 8541B in the automatic version, but the new engineer, for example, is also to have quartz as reference 3003.

The movement was still surrounded by a cage of soft iron, which kept magnetism up to 80,000 A/m from the caliber 8541ES. But in the midst of the quartz crisis of the watchmaking industry, sales were bad – only just under 1,000 pieces of IWC produced by the first engineer in the Genta design. Today, depending on the state, the watch reaches prices of up to 10,000 euros–and also counts for the rarest models of watch history thanks to its small edition. The entry prices at that time were significantly below: for 2,800 Deutsche Mark, the engineer in stainless steel changed the owner, in the bicolor version of 14-carat gold and stainless steel for 5,360 mark. The series added a gold-yellow version in 18 carats–but with its price of 18,300 mark it also struck a larger hole in the savings.

1983: IWC Engineer SL “Skinny”

1983, the engineer SL was flatter and smaller, significantly less than 40 millimeters in diameter now spoke to the watch carrier. The new version, because of its slender dimensions also called “skinny”, broke with a tradition: the Manufactory caliber. For the first time, IWC set an ETA base caliber in this series. The automatic plant ETA 2892 was refined in Schaffhausen and then ran under the caliber designation “375”. In the meantime, no unknown act in the House of IWC–many of the housings from the 1980s developed Lothar Schmidt, now the owner of special watches in Frankfurt.

1989: IWC engineer 500,000 A/m

1989 blew up the engineer’s boundaries. Based on a cooperation with the military, one developed materials that make a series movement extremely magnetic field resistant. The ETA 2892 is extensively rebuilt in many details. With the engineer 500,000 A/m, IWC now offered a watch with enormous protection against magnetic fields–and that without having to use a soft-iron housing.

Not only the inhibition, but also the spiral and the balance were built from alternative materials such as niobium-zircon 25, an iron and nickel-free alloy – with immense effort. What was very exciting about the technology, however, could not be implemented in practice: The cost of this development was extremely high, but the material of the balance spiral after the assembly and a test run proved to be stable only at a fraction of the produced pieces. At the beginning of the 1990s, the production of the IWC engineer 500,000 A/m already came to an end, after just 3,000 built specimens. Today, this IWC engineer is one of the rare models that its lovers are gradually taking for themselves.

Early 1990s: IWC engineer with quartz and mechanical Chronographenaufbau

With the Mecaquarz works, the IWC engineer appeared in the early 1990s. With the caliber 633, manufactured by Richemont-group sister Jaeger-LeCoultre, she now combined two stepper switching motors with a mechanically functioning Chronographenaufbau–and with an alarm clock. Even the mechanical clocks were now driven by Jaeger-LeCoultre works, where the caliber 889/2 was used under the name “887”. The models from the time are now available with some luck for amounts of 2,000 euros. A Chronometerzeugnis impressively proves its precision.

To this day, the IWC engineer has undergone little change in the classical design–but at the same size. In the course of time, the once large-scale “jumbo” became a small model, materials such as titanium (for example, the IWC engineer double-chronograph titanium) or ceramics (IWC engineer automatic AMG Black series ceramic) have been holding the watch for the last ten years for Engineers. 2005 appeared an engineer automatic, which was clearly reminiscent of Gérald Gentas SL and was equipped with the in-house caliber 80110. 2008 then remembered a vintage collection to the roots of the model, it quoted the style of the IWC watch before Gérald Gentas “Jumbo”.

2013, the designers at IWC were inspired by the carbon chassis of a Formula 1 racing car for their technician model: The Engineer Automatic carbon performance consists of both the 46 mm-large housing and the carbon-fibre dial. This makes the watch extremely light; However, the material is not as scratch-resistant as steel.

Here you can see the official video from IWC to the engineer:

2016: IWC engineer three times New with new manufactory caliber 69370

At the 74. Goodwood members ‘ meeting, IWC presents three new engineering models, which appear in limited edition and work with the new automatic manufactory caliber 69370. The Engineer Chronograph Edition “74th members ‘ meeting at Goodwood” in 42 millimeters large pink gold enclosure there is exactly 74 times, it costs 20,500 euro.

The engineer Chronograph Edition “Rudolf Caracciola” in the 42-millimeter steel case appears in the edition of 750 copies of 7,850 euro each.

and the Engineer Chronograph Edition “W 125” in 42 millimeters, titanium and also 750 copies is for 7,950 euro to have.

The IWC engineer today

Whether due to the zeitgeist or the aesthetics: the glass bottom of some current engineering models as well as that of the Goodwood Edition allows the magnetic field protection to enter the background. However, the technology goes back to the roots of the 1950s: with Pellaton lift, for example, the caliber 80110 shows a tradition-conscious technical aesthetic, complementing the mechanism only with an optimized shock absorber system. Whatever peculiarities the IWC engineer will have–she is a classic and has her safe place in the ancestral gallery of watches.

by Thomas Gronenthal

Continuously updated article, originally posted online in December 2014.

Tags: automatic clocks, chronograph, chronometer, date display, stainless steel watches, IWC, IWC engineer, ceramic watches, manufactory caliber, quartz, Swiss watches, Titan Watch, clock with magnetic field protection, clocks up to 10,000 euro, clocks up to 30,000 euro

Gallery

IWC Big Engineer 7 Days : IW500502 : IWC

IWC Big Engineer 7 Days : IW500502 : IWC

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

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IWC, 45mm "Big Ingenieur" Ref.5005 auto/date 7 days power ...

Source: www.passions.com.sg

Graduation gift for a future Engineer | Forum

Graduation gift for a future Engineer | Forum

Source: iwc.com

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Iwc Watches Engineer

Source: 408inc.com

Iwc Watches Engineer – 408INC BLOG

Iwc Watches Engineer – 408INC BLOG

Source: 408inc.com

IWC Big Ingenieur Chronograph Limited Edition : IW378403 : IWC

IWC Big Ingenieur Chronograph Limited Edition : IW378403 : IWC

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

IWC Big Ingenieur Chronograph Limited Edition : IW378403 : IWC

IWC Big Ingenieur Chronograph Limited Edition : IW378403 : IWC

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

IWC Big Ingenieur Zinedine Zidane 7 Days Limited Edition …

IWC Big Ingenieur Zinedine Zidane 7 Days Limited Edition ...

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

IWC Ingenieur Automatic AMG Black Series Ceramic …

IWC Ingenieur Automatic AMG Black Series Ceramic ...

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

IWC Big Engineer 7 Days : IW500505 : IWC

IWC Big Engineer 7 Days : IW500505 : IWC

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

Iwc Watches Engineer

Iwc Watches Engineer

Source: 408inc.com

Iwc Watches Engineer – 408INC BLOG

Iwc Watches Engineer – 408INC BLOG

Source: 408inc.com

Iwc Watches Engineer

Iwc Watches Engineer

Source: 408inc.com

The Watch Quote: The Watch Quote: List Price and tariff …

The Watch Quote: The Watch Quote: List Price and tariff ...

Source: www.thewatchquote.com

The Watch Quote: Photo

The Watch Quote: Photo

Source: www.thewatchquote.com

IWC BIG INGENIEUR CHRONOGRAPH new work Chrono IW378401 …

IWC BIG INGENIEUR CHRONOGRAPH new work Chrono IW378401 ...

Source: www.replicawatches.com.co

Iwc Watches Engineer

Iwc Watches Engineer

Source: 408inc.com

El Primero: IWC: Three Different Expressions

El Primero: IWC: Three Different Expressions

Source: el-primeros.blogspot.com

IWC Ingenieur Climate Action : IW323402 : IWC

IWC Ingenieur Climate Action : IW323402 : IWC

Source: www.horloger-paris.com

IWC Big Engineer 7 Days : IW500505 : IWC

IWC Big Engineer 7 Days : IW500505 : IWC

Source: www.horloger-paris.com